Nepali Times
From The Nepali Press
Prez or premier?, BBC Nepali Service



BBC Nepali: Why do you think Nepal needs a directly-elected executive president?
Sudheer Sharma:
The parliamentary system after the 1990 movement was the main reason for political instability in the country. A directly-elected executive head of state, whether a president or prime minister, will provide much needed stability and kick start the stalled development process. There is no guarantee that the new system will succeed, but given the ineffectiveness of the past system, it makes sense for us to adopt one where an elected government can at least complete its full tenure.

Narayan Wagle: Before calling the parliamentary system in Nepal a failure, we should remember that it was never allowed to function properly in the first place. People argue that the parliamentary system has bred corruption, but there are legal provisions within it to punish the guilty. On the one hand, leaders talk about decentralising governance and making it more inclusive, and on the other they advocate for a centralised system with a directly elected executive head.

SS: Although corruption is a serious concern, the inherently destabalising nature of the parliamentary systems is its greatest drawback. Before the royal takeover in 2005, we had 10 governments in 12 years, and given our deep-rooted coalition culture, the trend is likely continue unless we have a better system. And there is no reason why decentralisation of power at the local level cannot take place alongside effective governance at the centre. Regardless of whether the executive is directly elected or elected through parliament, its functions must be well-defined and it should be able to carry out its responsibilities without the political bickering that we see today.

NW: At a time when the general consensus seems to favor a federal system with a mixed electorate, it is wrong to assume that supporters of a Westminster system want to maintain the status quo. Besides, if we adopt a parliamentary system it will certainly be different than the previous one, because fundamental changes will be introduced. If we look at the experience of other countries, many of them have prospered irrespective of their form of governance.

SS: Once we finish writing the constitution, we will have a new state structure in place and to ensure that changes are institutionalised, we need an effective enforcement mechanism. However, we also need sufficient checks and balances to avoid the concentration of power in one office.

NW:
The last two decades of instability were not due to the failure of the system, but rather the failure of political parties. If our biggest concern is stability in politics, then let us not allow the opposition to bring 'no confidence' motions against the government for a certain period.

SS: The culture of politics in a parliamentary system is preoccupied with numbers and anybody can manipulate this system to gain an indirect majority in the parliament.

NW: Parliament is a place for numbers, and those who can convince the representatives with their arguments will have majority support. I see nothing wrong with that. At least such an executive is accountable to a parliament, unlike a directly-elected executive who is only accountable to people on the streets.

SS: It is wrong to assume that a directly-elected executive will necessarily lead to an authoritarian regime. There is a vibrant opposition in the legislature and an impeachment provision to ensure accountability. It's only a question of how that executive is elected.



1. who cares
directly elected executive head is the only solution with some conditions, check and balance....


fellow nepalese, please give 3min of your life to read this idea regarding future form of govt. of nepal: 

www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=345272122150626&id=343170315694140

if you like it please support it actively and share it with your friends and family and everyone. 



"....we should remember that it was never allowed to function properly in the first place. ...."

-- most of those who did not let that system work are the same elements inside the system like koirala, deuba, uml, madeshi politicians etc.. so we have to blame the system cause that system is the breeding ground of anti development elements.

only the highly educated countries like UK, Japan can afford this system where people will take care of the whole party if that party do not sack ill MPs or politicians... in nepal, big percentage of nepalese keep on voting even though that politician is clearly corrupt, incompetent or agent. ..

girija is one of the most hated and still he kept on willing the vote in the parliament... this is the proof. 

so this system does not work in present nepal. 



"The last two decades of instability were not due to the failure of the system, but rather the failure of political parties."

that's the same thing, its the system that gave birth to those parties and politicians. 



"If our biggest concern is stability in politics, then let us not allow the opposition to bring 'no confidence' motions against the government for a certain period."

you mean we should let agents sell our country. 


" .. unlike a directly-elected executive who is only accountable to people on the streets.  .."

referendum will take care of that problem.... please read my link above.... there will be risk passing the referendum ... if you go for referendum without the approval, you will be forced to stay away from active politics for two terms. 

if you work against the people, you will be forced away for one term.

and my kind of referendum will make sure that all the MPs respect the people of whole nepal not just the people of their constituency. 

and also, those MPs who go against executive head all the time by disrespecting people will be punished through referendum.


the referendum will make sure politicians and MPs keep in touch with people. not like what is going on in nepal at this time. 

trust me, it wont be expensive cause if they ask for referendum for wrong cause, they will face penalty. 






LATEST ISSUE
638
(11 JAN 2013 - 17 JAN 2013)


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