Nepali Times Asian Paints
Life Times
Painting dreams



AHMAD ISKANDAR
Last Sunday, Korean painter Maia Ruth Lee launched her solo exhibition Recollections Of The Lonesome Traveller at Siddhartha Art Gallery in some style. Nepali Times caught up with the young artist.

Where did you get the inspiration for the poetry and paintings?
It all started from the dreams I had. I would write down bits and pieces of whatever I could remember in my journal. The dreams were very graphic, and were naturally very good to draw inspiration from. I had new revelations each time I reviewed these writings.

Why the confessional poetry?
Before, I didn't really know how to write poems. So I started reading up about it from the works of the masters, such as Sylvia Path. I felt a kind of connection with her work, and eventually decided such a style would be helpful in conveying my ideas. Unfortunately, people are more familiar with her life than her works.

This is your third solo exhibition. How do you rate your progress?
Honestly, it feels like this is my first real solo exhibition. I think that I was too young then, and ended up being nonchalant about the exhibitions. I was only concerned about my works filling up the wall space. But now, since I had a strong idea of what I wanted from the beginning, it was much more satisfying. I still feel like I'm struggling, and am definitely far from reaching my peak. Maybe I have too high an expectation of myself.

Why Nepal?
I've always loved this gallery. It's been here for since as long as I can remember. But it also has more to do with the conducive environment here. Unlike in Korea, there is a culture here where people make the effort to appreciate such exhibitions and art. People are just too busy in Korea.

What do you think of the work of Nepali artists?
Nepali artists tend to go for a more abstract level of art, and that's a pity. Art starts with the history of it, which form the fundamentals of any artist. Abstract art is important too, but dangerous. There have been many works that are repetitive and lack originality. It's important to know why you're following a style. Nepali  artists need to be more daring and keep making more art.

So what's next for you?
I'll be leaving for Korea in July to help out in the next issue of Chillzine, one of my earlier projects. That will be for about a month, after which, I'm looking for a place to settle down where I can focus on my work and do some research. Nepal has been a perfect transition in my progress as an artist, but I've done too much moving around.

READ ALSO:
Buddhaland, Indu Nepal
Renewal: a time for change, Tsering Gellek
Himalyan Art revisited



LATEST ISSUE
638
(11 JAN 2013 - 17 JAN 2013)


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