Nepali Times
Letters


DOUBLETHINK
Now that you mention it (Editorial, 'Doublethink', #441) this country is in a timewarp in 1984. Nothing the Maoists have done (or not done) in the past two years gives me any reason to doubt that they are not serious about taking complete control. What I fail to understand is the why some of the so-called 'democratic' countries which have embassies in Kathmandu don't see through their lies.

Kabir Khatri,
email

* I agree with your editorial that the Maoists' timing of bringing out the draft constitution was not appropriate. Had it been during CA sessions, all of us would have had a good chance for a dignified debate. But like any democrat, I must say that we should be open for debate. Unlike a dictator, a democrat never runs away from a rational discourse and its popular resolution. Let's also debate whether those who advocate violent methods against the state and its citizens should be allowed to practice politics.

The Maoists mustn't commit the same mistake that all the rulers in the past did: that once elected they can do whatever they want.

Nirmal Ghimire,
email

Obstacles
Non-Maoist political and civil society groups and the general public share Ashutosh Tiwari's dilemma and frustration that he refers to in his Economic Sense column ('Red and white', #441). They fail to understand that Maoism is based on 'we are the righteous and our opponents, the sinners' and 'power comes from the barrel of a gun'. In the Maoist dictionary compromise, surrender, dialogue and reconciliation are only used tactically for camouflage. Since inception, their philosophy has been based on the premise that those who don't agree with them are the enemies. One must analyse the recent government activities and particularly Prachanda's public statements in this light.

I am not surprised that he repeatedly tells his cadres that they are preparing for ultimate revolt and capture of state, which means eliminating all opponents. It means 'safaya abhiyan', a process of removing obstacles in the path of revolution.

Kamal Kishor,
USA

CHANGING NEPAL
Thanks to Nepali Times for giving us hope that there are still people in this country who are doing their bit to help fellow- Nepalis despite the disruption and frustration all around. People like Ram Chandra Poudel ('Helping families afford education', #441) and Digumber Piya and Kiran Regmi ('Changing Nepal one girl at a time') are not quitters, they don't sit around and complain how bad things are. They do their bit selflessly to help others have the same opportunities they had. No Nepali needs to be left behind if we all help them with the prospect of a good education.

Diya Rai,
email



LATEST ISSUE
638
(11 JAN 2013 - 17 JAN 2013)


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