Nepali Times
Letters
Girija babu


The title of CK Lal's article ('Loving to hate Girijababu', #325) paints a true picture of our ambivalence towards Girija Babu. Often termed as inefficient, corrupt, and irrelevant within his own Koirala and kangresi clan, he has proven himself in the end. Today, he stands as the symbol of unity between the political parties and Maoist rebels. As the Grand Old Man of Nepal, he has redeemed himself and completed his duty towards the motherland by signing the Peace Accord after 10 years of war, political instability, international pressure, and other factors. To be sure, I never liked the man for his political short-sightedness and corruption that he engendered. Now it is the duty of the younger leaders in the NC to take over and lead this great nation. Great job, Girija Babu!

Pravesh Saria,
email


Divas Sarma (Letters, #325) is right about how the peace deal in Nepal got so little attention in the international media. As sad as it is, it is true that a historic event like this does not mean much when it is a country like Nepal and besides, the so-called 'international' media need their airtime and web space for something sexier than peace breaking out in Nepal. Perhaps the political pundits from Nepal should not have scheduled the event at the same time when Tom Cruise was getting married and Brittany Spears was getting a divorce!

Sushil Bogati,
Atlanta, USA


PM GP must be happy that those who used to chant "Talukhuile Girija, Bharat tira Chirija" want to nominate him for the Nobel Peace Prize. But the Nobel Prizes, especially those for Peace and Literature, are no less controversial than our own Grand Pa of Nepali Politics.

D Sarma,
Kathmandu

The persistent call for the abolition of the monarchy only stems from political parties with vested interests. This pathological, rabid hatred that the baddies espouse for His Majesty is not shared by and large by the Nepali people. And I'm not talking about the few hundred people who got asked in the capital. The end of the monarchy would open up and hand over tremendous wealth and assets to any government. Suddenly we'd need a lot of greedy and hungry politicians to manage trusts and funds supposedly for the benefit of the Nepali people. We all know who really stands to gain.

Rick,
email


One should think carefully, instead of before adopting the interim constitution in a hurry. Are we, as Nepalis, destroying our common identity and heritage in the name of progressive thinking? Will we destroy our social fibre which will, in turn, sow the seeds of national disintegration? All the major parties have endorsed the federal structure for Nepal without comprehending its long-term implications, but just as a trump card to counter Maoist appeal. Responsible political parties with a democratic history and credentials should not decide on issues of such far-reaching importance so lightly for short-term political mileage. The Maoists have always played this divisive role but responsible political parties can't compete with them on populism and divide the nation along ethnic, caste, regional and religious lines. The nine federal regions devised by the Maoists along indigenous lines are based on a faulty premise, because no region has a majority of the ethnic groups they are named after.

PB Rana,
email



LATEST ISSUE
638
(11 JAN 2013 - 17 JAN 2013)


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