Nepali Times Asian Paints
From The Nepali Press
"Winning an election a disadvantage"



MIN RATNA BAJRACHARYA
Why did you resign?

I've wanted to resign as minister of state at the home ministry for four months because of the worsening security situation. I hoped to focus on my work in the CA. However, I was told by the prime minister and party leaders to be patient. But the security situation only got worse. I felt morally obliged to submit a letter of resignation.

Why did the prime minister ask you to resign when the public's ire was directed at the home minister?
I'm surprised as well. I've had my letter of resignation in my pocket for four months. I would've submitted it if he hadn't asked for it. On the other hand, everyone's been asking the home minister to resign, including the public, party leaders, businesspeople and other officials. In this context, why I was asked to resign now is a mystery to me.

The prime minister didn't dare ask the state minister who slapped a CDO to resign. Why did he fix on you?
I don't know. The prime minister has been meaning to ask either the state minister or the home minister to resign for a while since they couldn't get along. I guess he picked the easier path.

You are the only UML member in government who was elected. Perhaps the elected and unelected have different mindsets?
When the government was formed, there was talk that I would be named the home minister. However, I was worried that I was underqualified, although I won the elections. Could it be that winning an election is politically disadvantageous?



LATEST ISSUE
638
(11 JAN 2013 - 17 JAN 2013)


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