Nepali Times Asian Paints
Nation
Non-violent action hero



ANUP PRAKASH
After two decades in the Nepali film industry, veteran actor Rajesh Hamal is as busy as ever. He has starred in 235 movies, but laments the fact that despite the progress made by the industry, it has not really been able to change. In this interview with Himal Khabarpatrika, Hamal candidly shares his opinion on violence in movies, the state of the country, and stresses that unity, not mutiny, is
the answer.

How would you assess the Nepali film industry?
In the past 5 to 6 years, international cinema has grown significantly. However, Nepali cinema has not been able to match this kind of growth.

Why do you think Nepali films copy Bollywood movies?
Politics and the culture of neighbours influence a country, and the same goes for cinema. Today, after mimicking numerous Hollywood films, Bollywood is in a position to compete with them. On the other hand, what do we consider 'originally Nepali'? Is it the old traditional Nepal, or the modern Nepal? Today's Nepalis are very different and depicting them with dhaka topi doesn't make them authentically Nepali. We can have Nepali actors flying in rockets to the moon and still consider them authentic Nepalis.

How long do you intend to act?
I think this decision is one for the audience! An artist aspires to remain an artist throughout his life, just like Amitabh Bachchan.

When will we get an opportunity to watch a movie directed by Rajesh Hamal?
I have an interest in creating and directing movies. Very soon you will get to watch a movie directed by me, also starring myself.

You also happen to be involved in anti-violence campaigns.
It is also the responsibility of an actor to serve the nation. I feel the participation of a public figure can make a contribution towards such a campaign.

Most Nepali films glorify violence.
Art imitates life, and vice versa. Commercial movies may depict violence to entertain their audiences to an extent but they condemn violence and never justify the use of it.

Why hasn't the Nepali film industry dealt with political issues?
It's not as if Nepali films have avoided politics altogether. Dusgaja dealt with border issues between Nepal and India, for instance. But it may be that in a situation of political flux, producers don't want to risk dealing with controversial issues.

Hasn't violence ruled over Nepali society as well?
In the last 12 years there's been a misconception that societal change and rights can be obtained through violence. Just because freedoms were obtained does not mean that violence was right. To sustain what has been achieved and further reform Nepal we now have to move towards agreement, cooperation and debate.



1. surya.thapa
hi im surya &dali News

LATEST ISSUE
638
(11 JAN 2013 - 17 JAN 2013)


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